Points for this activity were reversed because you removed the college from your Data Locker.
Points for this activity were reversed because you removed the scholarship from your Data Locker.
Points for this activity were reversed because you removed data to start your Admissions Profile.
Points for this activity were reversed because you removed data to start your College List.
Points for this activity were reversed because you removed SAT or ACT scores from your Admissions Profile.
Points for this activity were reversed because you removed application details from your Admissions Profile.
Points for this activity were reversed because you removed activities and awards from your Admissions Profile.
Points for this activity were reversed because you removed your weighted GPA from your Admissions Profile.
Points for this activity were reversed because you removed data to complete your Admissions Profile.

Get Started with Your College Applications

What's in a college application? If you are planning to go to college, it's time to find out.

Once senior year rolls around, filling out college applications may start to feel like a second job. Luckily, colleges ask for mostly the same information.

What a College Usually Asks in Its Application

A college application is designed to help you explain why you should be admitted. It documents your achievements and shows who you are beyond test scores and grades. Most college applications ask for the following information.

  • Facts About You
    The first section of the college application collects general information such as name, address, Social Security Number, parent/guardian info, and high schools attended. It will also ask for your senior year class schedule, test scores (such as the SAT or ACT), and any college credits you have earned.
  • Who You Are
    This section asks you to introduce yourself. Usually, you will write one or more personal statements, including an essay, and list your extracurricular activities, achievements, and work experience. Some applications let you attach a resume to make this easier.
  • Your Grades and Recommendations
    Your letters of recommendation and your high school transcripts are part of your application, but your high school sends them separately at your request.

Be Sure to Read the Instructions and Fill Out Everything

When you open an application, don't dive in immediately. Look over each part thoroughly. Note any instructions and deadlines. Fill it out completely. Leaving a space blank may delay the college's admission decision. If you have questions, ask an admission counselor, teacher, parent, or your high school guidance counselor for help.

Pay Attention to These Steps

  • Pay the application fee. Most colleges offer fee waivers based on your family income.
  • Have your test scores and any college credits sent to the college. You must request your test scores from the testing organizations. Send requests for college transcripts to the institution you attended.
  • Name your intended major if asked. If you don't know, select "undecided" or a very broad major such as English.
  • Answer specific questions the college asks. Examples include housing preferences, family members who are alumnae, and whether you intend to apply for scholarships and financial aid.
  • Supply samples of your work if applying to music, art, or theater programs. You may need to schedule an audition.
  • Report any disciplinary actions taken against you if asked. On the application, you can usually explain what happened and what you learned from it.

What's Next?

For Students Age 18 and Older

Have you received a Personal Invitation to apply for a Student Credit card?

Learn how to qualify for a Personal Invitation to apply for a Student Credit Card


1st Financial Bank believes students who pick colleges wisely will also want to learn how to use credit cards wisely.

cd$ My Data Locker

You must be logged in to view your Data Locker Dashboard

Log in to see all of your saved colleges, scholarships, articles, profiles and searches in one place. Access your Dashboard from any page.

COLLEGEdata Dollars are
points you earn by
completing certain
COLLEGEdata activities

Ways to earn
COLLEGEdata Dollars:

  • Complete your Admissions Profile.
  • Add colleges to your College Choices.
  • Update your Admissions Statuses.
  • Use the College Match tool.

What are COLLEGEdata Dollars (CD$)?

COLLEGEdata Dollars (CD$) are points you earn by completing certain COLLEGEdata activities. The maximum number of CD$ you can redeem is 5000. Once you have earned at least 2500 CD$, you can redeem them for $25, which will be provided to you on a Loyalty Card, and once you earn another 2500 CD$, you can redeem those CD$ for a second $25, which will also be provided to you on a Loyalty Card.

Earn points and redeem them for
U.S. Dollars

Complete certain COLLEGEdata activities (for example, signing up, starting your Admissions Profile, searching for colleges, calculating your chances for admission, searching for scholarships, updating your Profile with your admission decisions). Each activity is worth a specific amount of points (CD$). You can redeem the points you earn for U.S. Dollars that will be issued to you in the form of a 1st Financial Bank USA Loyalty Mastercard®.

How do I earn COLLEGEdata Dollars?

You can earn CD$ by completing certain COLLEGEdata activities. As soon as you sign up and activate your COLLEGEdata account, explore COLLEGEdata and begin completing COLLEGEdata activities to earn points.

Here is a full list of COLLEGEdata activities for which you may earn CD$ and the number of CD$ you can earn by completing each activity.*

Activity
CD$
×
Congratulations!
+ CD$
You just earned COLLEGEdata Dollars!
Check your CD$ Dashboard at the bottom of the page to view your CD$ balance, find other activities that you can complete to earn CD$, and redeem the CD$ you have earned for U.S. Dollars.